We’ve independently chosen our favourite titles to sell in our bookshops and online. And remember – we offer Free Postage in ROI on orders over €30 – just choose the Free Postage option at checkout.

  • Beekeeping is a popular past time that more and more people are turning to for personal enjoyment, or even small commercial gain. Today you will find hives in backyards, gardens, and on rooftops, benefiting both the bee and the keeper. For those who have begun their beekeeping journey and need a go-to pocket guide on establishing and maintaining their hives, The Beekeeper’s Field Guide is the perfect book. Not only will readers learn about a wide range of bee species and their life cycle, behaviour, and preferred plants, but readers will also be informed about the practicalities of beekeeping, from personal safety and hygiene to record keeping and legal requirements. With an extensive troubleshooting section that debunks myths, and includes explanations and solutions for “bad” bee behavior, diseases, and pests, The Beekeeper’s Field Guide is a handy-sized yet comprehensive tool for all keen and established beekeepers. Published 29th August 2024 - Order Now.
  • Why might an orangutan care which toothpaste you choose? What does your mobile phone have to do with wind turbines? And can your morning coffee really power a bus?Economics affects every aspect of our lives, from the clothes on our backs to the bread on our tables and the fuel in our cars. And there are huge changes afoot as the global green revolution sweeps across the globe. In this vibrant and eye-opening book, economist and broadcaster Dharshini David follows the course of an average day – from the moment we flick on the light in the morning – to reveal the green changes that are already taking place in every aspect of our world. Exploring industries such as energy, food, fashion, technology, manufacturing and finance, she asks what is happening, how quickly, who is driving it all – and what it means for us. Ranging from crucial issues such as sustainability and corporate greenwashing, to global flashpoints such as industrialisation and trade wars, she shows how even the smallest details in our day are part of a much bigger story about where our world is heading. If you’ve ever wondered what green issues really mean for your day-to-day life, this book is for you. ‘Opens our eyes to the everyday contributions all of us make to how the world is changing.’ Tim Marshall, author of Prisoners of Geography ‘A much needed blend of optimism and realism' Brett Christophers, author of The Price is Wrong: Why Capitalism Won't Save the Planet Published 20th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • The received wisdom in quantum physics is that, at the deepest levels of reality, there are no actual causes for atomic events. This idea led to the outlandish belief that quantum objects - indeed, reality itself - aren't real unless shaped by human measurement. Einstein mocked this idea, asking whether his bed spread out across his room unless he looked at it. And yet it remains one of the most influential ideas in science and our culture. In Escape from Shadow Physics, Adam Forrest Kay takes up Einstein's torch: reality isn't mysterious or dependent on human measurement, but predictable and independent of us. At the heart of his argument is groundbreaking research with little drops of oil. These droplets behave as particles do in the long-overlooked quantum theory of pilot waves; crucially, they display quantum behaviour while being described by classical physics. What if the original doubters of our quantum orthodoxy (not least Einstein himself) were onto something? What if pilot wave theory was right all along? In that case, our whole story of twentieth-century physics is topsy-turvyand we must give up the idea that reality is simply too weird to grasp. Weird it may still be, but a true understanding of nature now seems within our reach. Published 20th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • Time travel is a familiar theme of science fiction, but is it really possible?Surprisingly, time travel is not forbidden by the laws of physics - and John Gribbin argues that if it is not impossible then it must be possible. Gribbin brilliantly illustrates the possibilities of time travel by comparing familiar themes from science fiction with their real-world scientific counterparts, including Einstein's theories of relativity, black holes, quantum physics, and the multiverse, illuminated by examples from the fictional tales of Robert Heinlein, Larry Niven, Carl Sagan and others. The result is an entertaining guide to some deep mysteries of the Universe which may leave you wondering whether time actually passes at all, and if it does, whether we are moving forwards or backwards. A must-read for science fiction fans and anyone intrigued by deep science. published 6th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • To many, maths feels like an unmapped wilderness. Between abstract concepts like imaginary numbers and infinity, it can sometimes feel like a lot of maths is just made up. Why, for example, is 1 not a prime? Why do two negatives cancel each other out? Where does trigonometry come from? Is maths even real? Abstract mathematician Eugenia Cheng shows that curiosity is the best teacher. Is Maths Real? takes us on a scintillating tour of the simple questions that provoke mathematics' deepest insights. 'Masterfully uncovers what's simply profound in the profoundly simple'FRANCIS SU 'A generous tour of mathematics for anyone whose instincts tend less towards "Just tell me the answer" and more towards "Wait, but why?"' JORDAN ELLENBERG Published 6th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • No matter where we live, 'we are all ocean people,' Helen Scales observes in her bracing yet hopeful exploration of the future of the ocean. Beginning with its fascinating deep history, Scales links past to present to show how prehistoric ocean ecology holds lessons for the ocean of today. In elegant, evocative prose, she takes us into the realms of animals that epitomize current increasingly challenging conditions, from emperor penguins to sharks and orcas. Yet despite these threats, many hopeful signs remain, in the form of highly protected reserves, the regeneration of seagrass meadows and giant kelp forests and efforts to protect coral reefs. Offering innovative ideas for protecting coastlines and cleaning the toxic seas, Scales insists we need more ethical and sustainable fisheries and must prevent the other existential threat of deep-sea mining. Inspiring us all to maintain a sense of awe and wonder at the majesty beneath the waves, she urges us to fight for the better future that still exists for the ocean. Published 6th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • How does a delivery driver distribute hundreds of packages in a single working day? Why does remote Alaska have such a large airport? Where should we look for elusive serial killers? The answers lie in the crucial connection between maps and maths. In Mapmatics, Dr Paulina Rowinska embarks on a fascinating journey to discover the mathematical foundations of cartography and cartographical influences on mathematics. From a sixteenth-century map that remains an indispensable navigation tool despite emphasizing the North–South divide to public transport maps that both guide and mislead passengers, she reveals how maps and maths shape not only our sense of space and time but also our worldview. Through entertaining stories, surprising real-world examples and a cast of unforgettable characters, Mapmatics helps us to appreciate the mathematical methods and ideas behind maps. And, by illuminating how our world works, leaves us better equipped to understand and look after it. 'Historical insights and human stories... Highly readable' - Ian Stewart, author of What's the Use? 'An adventure' - Edward Brooke-Hitching, author of The Phantom Atlas Published 6th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • In Understorey, artist and writer Anna Chapman Parker records in prose and stunning original line drawings a year spent looking closely at weeds, our most ubiquitous and accessible plants. In gardens, on verges or clustered around municipal lampposts, weeds offer a year-round spectacle of wildlife. The benefits to us of being among greenery are well known, but what exactly are these vaguely familiar shapes that accompany our every step, yet pass beneath our notice? How and when do they emerge, bloom and subside, and what would it mean to notice them?Meditating too on how they appear in other artists’ work, from a bramble framing a sixth-century Byzantine manuscript to a kudzu vine installation in contemporary Berlin, Chapman Parker explores the art of paying attention even to the smallest things. Published 6th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • Five years after writing her first nature memoir, The Bumblebee Flies Anyway, Kate Bradbury has a new garden. It’s busy: home to all sorts of wildlife, from red mason bees and bumblebees to house sparrows, hedgehogs and dragonflies. It seems the entire frog population of Brighton and Hove breeds in her small pond each spring, and now there are toads here, too. On summer evenings, Kate watches bats flit above her and for a moment, everything seems alright with the world. But she knows habitat loss remains a huge issue in gardens, the wider countryside and worldwide, and there’s another, far bigger threat: climate change. Temperature increases are starting to bite, and she worries about what that will mean for our wildlife. In her uplifting new book, Kate writes passionately about how her climate-change anxiety pushes her to look for positive ways to keep going in a changing world. As in her first memoir, she invites you into her life, sharing stories of her mum’s ongoing recovery and her adventures with her new rescue dog, Tosca. One Garden Against the World is a call to action for all of us – gardeners, communities and individuals – to do more for wildlife and more for the climate. Climate change and biodiversity loss go hand in hand, but if we work together, it’s never too late to make a difference. Published 6th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • What is space? What is time? Where did the universe come from? The answers to mankind’s most enduring questions may lie in science’s greatest enigma: black holes. A black hole is a region of space where gravity is so strong that nothing, not even light, can escape. This can occur when a star approaches the end of its life. Unable to generate enough heat to maintain its outer layers, it shrinks catastrophically down to an infinitely dense point. When this phenomenon was first proposed in 1916, it defied scientific understanding so much that Albert Einstein dismissed it as too ridiculous to be true. But scientists have since proven otherwise. In 1971, Paul Murdin and Louise Webster discovered the first black hole: Cygnus X-1. Later, in the 1990s, astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope found that not only do black holes exist, supermassive black holes lie at the heart of almost every galaxy, including our own. It would take another three decades to confirm this phenomenon. On 10 April 2019, a team of astronomers made history by producing the first image of a black hole. A Crack in Everything is the story of how black holes came in from the cold and took cosmic centre stage. As a journalist, Marcus Chown interviews many of the scientists who made the key discoveries, and, as a former physicist, he translates the most esoteric of science into everyday language. The result is a uniquely engaging page-turner that tells one of the great untold stories in modern science. Published 6th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • By the end of this decade, AI will exceed human levels of intelligence. During the 2030s, it will become 'superintelligent', vastly outstripping our capabilities by almost every measure and enabling dramatic new interventions in our bodies. By 2045, we will be able to connect our brains directly with AI, enhancing our intelligence a millionfold and expanding our consciousness in ways we can barely imagine. This is the Singularity. Ray Kurzweil is one of the greatest inventors of our time with over 60 years' experience in the field of Artificial Intelligence. Dozens of his long-range predictions about the rise of the internet, AI and bioengineering have been borne out. In this visionary and fundamentally optimistic book, Kurzweil explains how the Singularity will occur and explores what it will mean to live free from the limits of biology. What will we choose if our bodies need no longer define us? What new realms of beauty, connection and wonder might we inhabit? Who will we become if our minds can be stored and duplicated? How will we navigate the risks presented by such awesomely powerful technology? Drawing on a lifetime's expertise and marshalling the evidence of today's rapidly accelerating advances, Kurzweil presents deeply reasoned answers to these questions and argues that we can and will transform life on earth profoundly for the better. 'Ray Kurzweil is the best person I know at predicting the future of artificial intelligence' BILL GATES Published 27th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • A sweeping intellectual history of games and their importance to human progress. We play games to learn about the world, to understand our minds and the minds of others, and to practice making predictions about the future. Games are thought to be older than written language, and have now become the dominant cultural media—bigger than movies, TV, music, and literature combined. They are also fun. But as neuroscientist and physicist Kelly Clancy argues, it’s time we started taking them more seriously. In Playing With Reality, she chronicles the riveting and hidden history of games since the Enlightenment, weaving an unexpected path through military theory, biology, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and the future of democracy. Games, Clancy shows us, have been deeply intertwined with the arc of history. War games shaped the outcomes of real wars in nineteenth and twentieth century Europe. Game theory warped our understanding of human behaviour and brought us to the brink of annihilation—yet still underlies basic assumptions in economics, politics, and technology. We used games to teach computers how to learn for themselves, and now we are designing games that will determine the shape of society and future of democracy. Games also inform the basic systems that govern our daily lives: the social media and technology that can warp our preferences, polarise us, and manufacture our desires. Lucid, thought-provoking, and masterfully told, Playing With Reality makes the bold argument that the human fascination with games is the key to understanding our nature. ‘A book to get the neurons firing. As a passionate game player I loved reading a neuroscientist’s perspective on the role games have played in humanity’s attempts to navigate the game of life. A dopamine hit on every page’ Marcus du Sautoy Published 18th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • On the morning of 28 January 1986, just seventy-three seconds into flight, the space shuttle Challenger broke apart over the Atlantic Ocean, killing all seven people on board. Millions around the world witnessed the tragic deaths of the crew, which included schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe. Like the assassination of JFK, the Challenger disaster is a defining moment in twentieth century history - one that forever changed the way America thought of itself and its optimistic view of the future. Yet the full story of what happened - and why - has never been told. Based on extensive archival research and meticulous, original reporting, Challenger: A True Story of Heroism and Disaster on the Edge of Space follows a handful of central protagonists - including each of the seven members of the doomed crew - through the years leading up to the accident, a detailed account of the tragedy itself, and into the investigation that followed. It's a compelling tale of optimism and ingenuity shattered by political cynicism and cost-cutting in the interests of burnishing national prestige; of hubristic 'go fever'; and of an investigation driven by heroic leakers and whistle-blowers determined to bring the truth to light. With astonishing clarity and narrative verve, Adam Higginbotham reveals the history of the shuttle program, the lives of men and women whose stories have been overshadowed by the disaster, as well as the designers, engineers and test pilots who struggled against the odds to get the first shuttle into space. A masterful blend of riveting human drama, fascinating science and shocking political infighting, Challenger brings to life a turning point in our history. The result is an even more complex and extraordinary story than any of us remembered - or thought possible. Published 13th June 2024 - Order Now.
  • From a world-leading hormones specialist, the definitive book on the science of hormones and how understanding the secrets of our body’s messengers can revolutionise our health and wellbeing Hormones are the messengers that drive every process in our body. They are essential to how we grow, fight disease and digest food; why we struggle to sleep, lose weight and manage stress – and so much more. When our hormones are imbalanced this can wreak havoc on our health, leading to conditions as far reaching as diabetes, infertility and heart disease. They also influence our personalities, how we feel and even the decisions we make. And yet for too long the power of our body’s messengers has been overlooked. In this vital and myth-busting book, world-leading hormones expert Dr Max Nieuwdorp transforms our understanding of our bodies. Combining stories from his daily life treating his patients with amazing, cutting-edge new science, he reveals the crucial role that hormones play from our early years through to old age, exploring everything from the effect that smartphones have on our sleep and longevity to how our gut bacteria produce ‘happy’ hormones. As Nieuwdorp reveals, hormones are central to our moods, our relationships and so much of what makes us who we are. Demystifying the signals of our bodies, he explores how we can rebalance our hormones for happier and healthier lives. 'Every page of this book is fascinating, glorious, and profound. This is one of the great frontiers of science for our age' Daniel M. Davis 'Professor Max Nieuwdorp has written a delightfully readable book... A deep and fascinating look into a critical aspect of what makes us human and points the way to becoming our better selves' Dr. Brian Goldman Published 23rd May 2024 - Order Now.
  • This book introduces the new and fascinating field of Clinical Neuroscience, which argues that the brain has the power to prevent and treat a variety of neurobiological disorders, from autism to attention deficit disorder. With ground-breaking neuroscience research presented in an accessible, easy-to-understand way The Brain Code teaches readers how to get the most from their brains, how to access their peak cognitive function. Each chapter will look at different functions of the brain: how can we regulate and control our emotions and thereby promote optimal thinking and behaviour - improving creative thinking through some simple tried-and-tested tricks - efficient ways to use memory and thinking to improve our learning ability - steps to take to promote peaceful sleep - recent brain research describing natural ways to deal with fears and anxieties - look behind the scenes at a mind in love and understand how the knowledge can be harnessed to manage more successful relationships. Dr Yossi Chalamish uses his expertise in neuroscience to provide contemporary research on how each brain function works, featuring case studies from his clinical experience that illustrate its function, and practical exercises and tools to improve your cognitive abilities in your everyday life.
  • There's so much talk about the threat posed by intelligent machines that it sometimes seems as though we should surrender to our robot overlords. But Junaid Mubeen isn't ready to throw in the towel just yet. As far as he is concerned, we have the creative edge over machines, because of a remarkable system of thought that humans have developed over the millennia. It's familiar to us all, but often badly taught in schools and misrepresented in popular discourse - maths. Computers are, of course, brilliant at totting up sums, pattern-seeking and performing mindless tasks of, well, computation. For all things calculation, machines reign supreme. But Junaid identifies seven areas of intelligence where humans can retain a crucial edge. And in exploring these areas, he opens up a fascinating world where we can develop our uniquely human mathematical superpowers.
  • Artificial intelligence will shake up our lives as thoroughly as the arrival of the internet. This popular, up-to-date book charts AI’s rise from its Cold War origins to its explosive growth in the 2020s. Tech journalist Chris Stokel-Walker (TikTok Boom and YouTubers) goes into the laboratories of the Silicon Valley innovators making rapid advances in ‘large language models’ of machine learning. He meets the insiders at Google and OpenAI who built Gemini and ChatGPT and reveals the extraordinary plans they have for them. Along the way, he explores AI’s dark side by talking to workers who have lost their jobs to bots and engages with futurologists worried that a man-made super-intelligence could threaten humankind. He answers critical questions about the AI revolution, such as what humanity might be jeopardising; the professions that will win and lose; and whether the existential threat technologists Elon Musk and Sam Altman are warning about is realistic – or a smokescreen to divert attention away from their growing power. How AI Ate the World is a ‘start here’ guide for anyone who wants to know more about the world we have just entered.
  • A dog-owner’s bible for a wealth of fun, welcoming and quirky adventures in the UK and Ireland. A staggering one third of British households now own a dog as a pet, meaning dog-friendly days out and weekend trips are becoming ever more popular. Finding reliable and comprehensive information on dog-friendly activities, though, is getting harder thanks to the deluge of online content, much of which doesn’t offer in-depth information on the kinds of things dog owners need to know. Dog Days Out solves that problem, offering 365 ideas for things to do around the UK with your four-legged friend, such as long rambles in the countryside, brilliant beaches to play fetch on, and exciting attractions and quirky accommodation options. From the rugged countryside of Ireland and Northern Ireland to the beaches of Cornwall, Kent and the Scottish Highlands, plus castles, country houses and cracking walks to be had in between, this book will provide an abundance of ideas for an hour, half a day or a whole day out to suit all weathers. Gorgeous maps and beautiful photography make this both an aspirational and endlessly useful read. The long list of brilliant activities is accompanied by essential practical information for dog owners, such as local bylaws, rules for dogs, wildlife to be aware of, safety tips, solo travel with dogs, activities with reactive dogs, and accessible dog days out.
  • Hacking, espionage, war and cybercrime as you've never read about them beforeFancy Bear was hungry. Looking for embarrassing information about Hillary Clinton, the elite hacking unit within Russian military intelligence broke into the Democratic National Committee network, grabbed what it could, and may have contributed to the election of Donald Trump. Robert Morris was curious. Experimenting one night, the graduate student from Cornell University released "the Great Worm" and became the first person to crash the internet. Dark Avenger was in love. To impress his crush, the Bulgarian hacker invented the first mutating computer virus-engine and nearly destroyed the anti-virus industry. Why is the internet so insecure? How do hackers exploit its vulnerabilities? Fancy Bear Goes Phishing tells the stories of five great hacks, their origins, motivations and consequences. As well as Fancy Bear, Robert Morris and Dark Avenger, we meet Cameron Lacroix, a sixteen-year-old from South Boston, who hacked Paris Hilton's cell phone because he wanted to be famous and Paras Jha, a Rutgers undergraduate, who built a giant botnet designed to get him out of his calculus exam and disrupt the online game Minecraft, but which almost destroyed the internet in the process. Scott Shapiro's five stories demonstrate that computer hacking is not just a tale of technology, but of human beings. Yet as Shapiro shows, hackers do not just abuse computer code - they exploit the philosophical principles of computation: the very features that make computers possible also make hacking possible. He explains how our information society works, the ways our data is stored and manipulated, and why it is so subject to exploitation. Both intellectual romp and dramatic true-crime narrative, Fancy Bear Goes Phishing exposes the secrets of the digital age.
  • We already know how much of our data is collected and used to profile and target us. The real question is why, knowing all this, do we keep going back for more? Technology has delivered a world that we expect to revolve around us, our needs and preferences, and our unique personalities. We willingly hand over intimate information about ourselves in return for a world that's easier to navigate. We live in the Personalised Century, where we view ourselves in terms of what rather than who we are - the objects of others' recognition, rather than the subjects and authors of our own lives. Is this a sign of our shrinking sense of self? Interrogating the historical currents that have brought us here, Harkness envisages a messier, riskier and less comfortable world than the one into which we're sliding. Challenging readers to look at what's missing from their personalised menus, Technology is not the Problem encourages us to look afresh at the familiar: not just the technology we use every day, how we relate to the world and those around us. "Great book" - Matt Ridley, author of How Innovation Works Published 23rd May 2024 - Order Now.
  • The Unnatural History of Animals tells the remarkable story of Trinity College’s Zoological Museum, hidden in the heart of Ireland’s oldest university. The book brings the museum’s colourful residents to life and uncovers a rich legacy of collecting from the 1800s to the present day, incorporating tales of adventure and tragedy, survival and extinction – all deeply rooted in the 25,000 animals that make up the Zoological Museum. Meet the loveable royal elephant, ‘Prince Tom’, who travelled the world with Prince Alfred (Queen Victoria’s second son) only to meet his untimely death in Dublin Zoo. Follow the final journey of ‘Ireland’s last Great Auk’, extinct since 1844. And explore the magic of discovering new things: specimens hidden away from the public view for nearly a century, forgotten about, reconciled to history, now brought back to life as a museum once in decline slowly resurrects itself. The Unnatural History of Animals is essentially about animals and their background stories, but it’s also a book about people and connections – links to the past with portents for the future – following a company of adventurers and naturalists from Captain James Cook and Charles Darwin to Sir David Attenborough. Their paths crossed with the museum in different ways, and each has their own story to tell. Authored by the curator who has cared for the museum for over 20 years, The Unnatural History of Animals aspires to educate, entertain, inform and inspire. It highlights the damage that has already been done to our planet and the animals and plants that share it with us. Through the publication of this book, Dublin at last may lose its ‘best kept secret’. It’s already happening: the museum has featured twice on the Ryan Tubridy Show, on various radio stations, and in the print media. During the summer months visitors will once again be welcome to visit, as they have done since its formal opening five years ago. Published 23rd May 2024 - Order Now.
  • From the author of the award-winning bestseller An Irish Atlantic Rainforest comes The Magic of An Irish Rainforest: A Visual Journey. In 2023, environmentalist and rewilder Eoghan Daltun travelled the length and breadth of Ireland photographing areas of temperate rainforest, in a bid to illustrate their beauty and immense ecological value, and to document, in almost all cases, their state of decline. The resulting collection of stunning images, combined with deeply illuminating nature writing, charts that exploration, beginning with the author's own thriving wild rainforest on the Beara Peninsula, West Cork, and taking us through the four provinces of Ireland - places such as Killarney National Park, Kerry; The Gearagh, Cork, The Burren, Clare; Old Head Wood, County Mayo; Glenveagh National Park, Donegal; Correl Glen and Cladagh Glen, County Fermanagh; and Wicklow's beauty spot of Glendalough. From close-range to wide-lens, luscious forest imagery and landscapes are captured, unimaginably rich in native flora and fauna, offering us a deep insight into rare and priceless ecosystem fragments that we still have but are losing fast, alongside a compelling treatise for how that could so easily be changed for the better. Published on 24th September 2024 - Order Now.
  • The ocean covers seventy per cent of the surface of our planet, and two thirds of this lie beyond national borders. Owned by all nations and no nation simultaneously, these waters are home to some of the richest and most biodiverse environments on the planet. But they are also home to exploitation on a scale that few of us can imagine. Here, industry and economic progress rule and lax enforcement and apathy are the status quo. Out of sight and often out of mind, a battle rages to control, profit from, protect, or obliterate the world's largest, wildest commons. Heffernan sets sail on a journey to uncover the truth behind deeply exploitative fishing practices, investigate the potentially devastating impact of deep-sea mining, and hold to task the Silicon-valley interventionists whose solutions to climate change are often wildly optimistic, radically irresponsible or both. The result is a forceful and deeply researched manifesto calling for the protection and preservation of this final frontier - the last vestiges of wilderness on Earth. 'A vital, fascinating, deeply researched exploration of Earth's last wilderness... Shocking and starkly illuminating - a must-read.' Gaia Vince Published 23rd May 2024 - Order Now.
  • politics, science to crime, these are the stories of the trees that have shaped life on Earth. Neurobiologist and philosopher Stefano Mancuso brings his signature charm and eye for unforgettable detail to tell eight stories of trees that have rooted themselves in human history - from the red spruces that were made into Stradivarius' violins to the wooden ladder that solved 'The Crime of the Century'. Combining scientific vigour with his inimitable voice, Mancuso reveals the amazing ways that the world's green-print has shaped the course of our lives, issuing a passionate rallying cry for greater care and attention towards the plants that have helped us survive and thrive.
  • From the acclaimed author of Rewild Yourself comes a brilliant book that reveals the natural joys to be discovered on your doorstep. In the autumn of 2020, Simon Barnes should have been leading a safari in Zambia, but Covid restrictions meant his plans had to be put on hold. Instead, he embarked on the only voyage of discovery that was still open to him. He walked to a folding chair at the bottom of his garden, and sat down. His itinerary: to sit in that very same spot every day for a year and to see - and hear - what happened all around him. It would be a stationary garden safari; his year of sitting dangerously had begun. For the next twelve months, he would watch as the world around him changed day by day. Gradually, he began to see his surroundings in a new way; by restricting himself, he opened up new horizons, growing even closer to a world he thought he already knew so well. The Year of Sitting Dangerously is a wonderfully evocative read; it inspires the reader to pay closer attention to the marvels that surround us all, and is packed with handy tips to help bring nature even closer to us.
  • Then, just in time, before I swung the spade again, I saw, right by the blade and camouflaged by the leaves on the ground, a magpie chick. It squatted belligerently, peering up at me with miniature magpie fury. George. When Frieda Hughes moved to the depths of the Welsh countryside, she was expecting to take on a few projects: planting a garden, painting and writing her poetry column for the Times. But instead, she found herself rescuing a baby magpie, the sole survivor of a nest destroyed in a storm - and embarking on an obsession that would change the course of her life. As the magpie, George, grows from a shrieking scrap of feathers and bones into an intelligent, unruly companion, Frieda finds herself captivated - and apprehensive of what will happen when the time comes to finally set him free. 'A magical, endearing memoir ... the literary romance of the year' Oprah 'This book pulses with a defiant wonder at the living world, as wild and unruly as our feathered hero' Polly Morland, author of A Fortunate Woman
  • An illuminating insight into the Metaverse - what it is, how it works, and and why it will soon be playing a major role in business, technology and society. In Into the Metaverse, Cathy Hackl, a globally recognized futurist and one of the world’s first Chief Metaverse Officers, shares her insights on what companies need to do to harness the next iteration of the internet - the metaverse. In this book you’ll find a wealth of information on issues such as:- What is the metaverse and what it means for your brand, organization or company- How to make money in the metaverse through understanding the underlying concepts behind it such as gaming, synthetic media, spatial computing and artificial intelligence. - How to lead in the metaverse through industries that are already forging ahead, such as fashion and marketing. - Who should manage the metaverse function within your organization and why some companies should consider creating a role for a Chief Metaverse Officer. - Finally, how to protect the metaverse and action steps you can take towards the future. Essential reading for any executive, Into the Metaverse, will reshape how you think about the internet and its place for those who want to lead successful businesses, today and into the future. If the internet was first used to connect us to information, and then developed into a social media forum to connect people, then Web3, which connects people, places and things, will help enable the successor state to today’s mobile internet - the Metaverse. It will bring together and merge our physical and digital lives, and - in the same way that social media upended our lives and our businesses - the Metaverse will shake things up even more. Into the Metaverse is the essential business guide to understanding the ground-breaking technologies that enable this monumental shift and the opportunities it presents from a business and societal perspective.
  • Delving into the recent discovery of the brain's immune system, Dr Monty Lyman reveals the extraordinary implications for our physical and mental health. Until a decade ago, we misunderstood a fundamental aspect of human health. Although the brain and the body have always been viewed as separate entities - treated in separate hospitals - science now shows that they are intimately linked. Startlingly, we now know that our immune system is in constant communication with our brain and can directly alter our mental health. This has opened up a new frontier in medicine. Could inflammation cause depression, and arthritis drugs cure it? Can gut microbes shape your behaviour through the vagus nerve? Can something as simple as brushing your teeth properly reduce your risk of dementia? Could childhood infections lie behind neurological and psychiatric disorders such as tics and OCD?In The Immune Mind, Dr Monty Lyman explores the fascinating connection between the mind, immune system and microbiome. A specialist in the cutting-edge field of immunopsychiatry, Lyman argues that we need to change the way we treat disease and the way we see ourselves. For the first time, we have a new approach to medicine that treats the whole human being.
  • Can you tell a tomato from a grape? A patch of grass from a Christmas tree? Then congratulations – you’re a botanist. Self-confessed bad birdwatcher Simon Barnes thought he knew nothing about plants. He didn't have anything against them: trees are interesting because birds perch in them; plants are useful because they create habitats, and all birds live in habitats. But while admiring the tenacity of some yellow horned poppies thriving on a shingle beach – a place where it seemed no plant had a hope of surviving – he was struck by a simple yet profound truth. It all begins with plants. In this charming and inspiring book, Barnes takes us on a fascinating journey, from the simple genius of photosynthesis to the complex and bizarre ways that plants reproduce. We consider plants as varied as cabbages and conifers, familiar wildflowers and enigmatic orchids, nefarious parasites and plants that carry deadly poisons – helping us better appreciate the beauty and diversity of the natural world. Both a primer on botany and an exploration of how plants make our external and interior worlds, How to Be a Bad Botanist opens our eyes to the wonders around us. Plants are everywhere, in every part of your life, and you know more than you think. As seen at our Bord Bia Bloom 2024 bookstall.
  • If forests are the lungs of the planet, then animals migrating across oceans, streams, and mountains-eating, pooping, and dying along the way-are its heart and arteries, pumping nitrogen and phosphorus from deep-sea gorges up to mountain peaks, from the Arctic to the Caribbean. Without this conveyor belt of crucial, life-sustaining nutrients, the world would look very different. The dynamics that shape our physical world-atmospheric chemistry, geothermal forces, plate tectonics, and erosion through wind and rain-have been explored for decades. But the effects on local ecosystems of less glamorous forces-rotting carcasses and deposited feces-as well as their impact on the global climate cycle, have been largely overlooked. The simple truth is that pooping and peeing are daily rituals for almost all animals, the ellipses of ecology that flow through life. We eat, we poop, and we die. From the volcanoes of Iceland to the tropical waters of Hawaii, the great plains of the American heartland, and beyond, Eat, Poop, Die takes readers on an exhilarating and enlightening global adventure, revealing the remarkable ways in which the most basic biological activities of animals make and remake the world-and how a deeper understanding of these cycles provides us with opportunities to undo the environmental damage humanity has wrought on the planet we call home.
  • Adventures in Volcanoland charts journeys across deserts, through jungles and up ice caps, to some of the world's most important volcanoes, from Nicaragua to Hawaii, Santorini to Ethiopia, exploring Tamsin Mather's obsession with these momentous geological formations, the cultural and religious roles they have played in the minds of those living around them at different times throughout history, and the science behind their formation and eruptions. Volcanoes help to make and shape our world, bursting forth from inside of the earth and, in many places, looming over us. Present since the earth's beginning they continue to maintain its life support systems and, their extraordinary chemistry may even have created the ingredients needed for life to kick start. In some places volcanoes are even beginning to provide us with part of the energy we need to curb our use of fossil fuels. They have fascinated humans for millennia, their eruptions charted throughout history, seeming to show us how the earth has been living, breathing and changing for billions of years. Why exactly are these geological mammoths found where they are? What can they teach us about our environment, the Anthropocene and the ecological disaster that is climate change? Are there volcanoes on other planets, and what might they tell us about whether we could one day live there if we exhaust our own habitat? How can we predict if or when volcanoes might explode? Adventures in Volcanoland is an enthralling mix of travel, science and environmental writing for fans of Robert MacFarlane and Raynor Winn.
  • In May 2022, the Royal Swedish Academy of Science released a paper that measured fourteen European countries on three factors: biodiversity, wellbeing, and nature connectedness. Britain came last in every single category. The findings are clear: we are suffering – and nature is too. Enter ‘Wild Service’ – a visionary concept crafted by the pioneers of the Right to Roam campaign, which argues that humanity’s loss and nature’s need are two sides of the same story. Blending science, nature writing and indigenous philosophy, this groundbreaking book calls for mass reconnection to the land and a commitment to its restoration. In Wild Service we meet Britain’s new nature defenders: an anarchic cast of guerilla guardians who neither own the places they protect, nor the permission to restore them. Still, they’re doing it anyway. This book is a celebration of their spirit and a call for you to join. So, whether you live in the countryside or the city, want to protect your local river or save our native flora, this is your invitation to rediscover the power in participation – the sacred in the service. ‘A reckoning with our past and a vision for a new ecological future’ Amy-Jane Beer ‘Seeks to undo the damage of exclusionary ownership through the transformative power of belonging’ Guy Shrubsole
  • From the icy oceans of our poles to remote coral islands, David Attenborough has filmed in every ocean habitat on planet earth. Now, with long-term collaborator Colin Butfield, he shares the story of our last great, critical wilderness, and the one which shapes the land we live on, regulates our climate and creates the air we breathe. Through one hundred years, eight unique ocean habitats, countless intriguing species - and through personal stories, history and cutting-edge science - Ocean uncovers the mystery, the wonder and the frailty of the most unexplored habitat on our planet. And it shows its remarkable resilience: it is the part of our world that can, and in some cases has, recovered the fastest, and in our lifetimes we could see a fully restored marine world, even richer and more spectacular than we could possibly hope, if we act now. It is a book almost a century in the making, but one that has never been more urgently needed. Published 8th May 2025. Order Now.
  • Bees, butterflies, bats, badgers …These beautiful and fascinating creatures need a little help from us, as their natural habitats are under pressure. It’s time to invite nature into your home – whether it’s a window box, a suburban garden or a farm. Learn how to build a pond, make places for bats to roost and spaces for hedgehogs to ramble. Discover the amazing secret lives of Ireland’s wildlife, from tiny bugs to large mammals. Do try this at home! Great for Ages 10+. Published 10th April 2024. Order Now.
  • In the 18th century, two men dedicated their lives to the same daunting task: identifying and describing all life on Earth. Their approaches could not have been more different. Carl Linnaeus, a pious Swedish doctor with a huckster's flair, believed that life belonged in tidy, static categories. Georges-Louis de Buffon, an aristocratic polymath and keeper of France's royal garden, viewed life as a dynamic, ever-changing swirl of complexities. Both began believing their work to be difficult, but not impossible--how could the planet possibly hold more than a few thousand species? Stunned by life's diversity, both fell far short of their goal. But in the process they articulated starkly divergent views on nature, on humanity's role in shaping the fate of our planet, and on humanity itself. The rivalry between these two unique, driven individuals created reverberations that still echo today. Linnaeus, with the help of acolyte explorers he called "apostles" (only half of whom returned alive), gave the world such concepts as mammal, primate and homo sapiens--but he also denied species change and promulgated racist pseudo-science. Buffon coined the term reproduction, formulated early prototypes of evolution and genetics, and argued passionately against prejudice. It was a clash that, during their lifetimes, Buffon seemed to be winning. But their posthumous fates would take a very different turn. With elegant, propulsive prose grounded in more than a decade of research, bestselling author Jason Roberts tells an unforgettable true-life tale of intertwined lives and enduring legacies, tracing an arc of insight and discovery that extends across three centuries into the present day. Published 11th April 2024. Order Now.
  • We rarely think about the energy systems that prop up our existence. With hot water, lighting and digital entertainment all available at the flick of a switch, it's easy to underestimate the vast global network that makes these things possible. Growing up in Iraq, Yasmin Ali regularly experienced power cuts - ironic for a country rich in oil and sunshine. Now as an engineer working in energy, Yasmin has a deep appreciation for what these resources mean for our lives. In Power Up she takes us on a journey across the globe to reveal the bigger picture, from solar farms shimmering in the desert to power stations hidden deep in the mountains. We discover where we get energy from, how it is moved and used around the world - and why we need to understand the whole system if we want to transition towards a clean, green future. Power Up is a definitive picture of the intricate world that humanity has built, and a rallying cry to face the challenges of climate change using the power at our fingertips. 'A powerful and often lyrical book ... Fascinating and insightful in equal measure' MARK MIODOWNIK, author of Stuff Matters and Liquid 'Ali's enthusiasm for energy infrastructure electrifies this engaging tour of the people and structures that power our modern world' GAIA VINCE, author of Nomad Century 'Highly recommend ... a warm and educational read' ROMA AGRAWAL, author of Built and Nuts and Bolts
  • There is only one scenario other than an asteroid strike that could end the world as we know it in a matter of hours: nuclear war. And it could start in as little as 26 minutes and 40 seconds from now... An edge-of-your-seat non-fiction thriller for readers of American Prometheus by Kai Bird or Midnight in Chernobyl by Adam Higginbotham. The first rule of nuclear war is that there are no rules. Until now, no one outside official circles has known exactly what would happen if a rogue state launched a nuclear missile at the Pentagon. Second by second and minute by minute, these are the real-life protocols that choreograph the end of civilization as we know it. If a single nuclear missile is launched, it could provoke dozens in return. Frantic calls over secure lines work to confirm the worst as armoured helicopters are scrambled outside. Decisions that affect hundreds of millions of lives need to be made within six minutes, based on partial information, in the knowledge that once launched, nothing is capable of halting the destruction. Because the plans for General Nuclear War are among the most classified secrets held by the United States government, this book takes the reader up to the razor's edge of what can legally be known. Based on dozens of new interviews with military and civilian experts who have built the weapons, been privy to the response plans, and taken responsibility for crucial decisions, this is the only account of what a nuclear exchange would look like. Nuclear War is at once a compulsive non-fiction thriller and a powerful argument that we must rid ourselves of these world-ending weapons for ever.
  • Newly discovered strangenesses could transform our understanding of the fundamentals of physics - and of the nature of reality. In this eye-opening account, CERN experimental physicist Harry Cliff takes the reader on a tour of a new universe. Something strange is going on in the cosmos. Scientists are uncovering a catalogue of weird phenomena that simply can't be explained by our long-established theories of the universe. Particles with unbelievable energies are bursting from beneath the Antarctic ice. Unknown forces seem to be tugging on the basic building blocks of matter. Stars are flying away from us far faster than anyone can explain. In Space Oddities, Harry Cliff provides a riveting look at the universe's most confounding puzzles. In a journey that spans continents, he meets the scientists hunting for answers, and asks: Are these anomalies accidents of nature, or could they be pointing us toward vast, hidden worlds? With wonder, clarity, and a dose of humour, Cliff leads us on a a mind-expanding investigation of physics and cosmology as they transform before us. 'As fascinating as its title suggests... Cliff recounts with vivid clarity the stories of some of the most striking oddnesses that have lit up the landscape of modern physics.' Philip Pullman.
  • What does it mean to be human in a world that is rapidly changing thanks to the development of artificial intelligence, of automated decision-making that both draws on and influences our behaviour? Through the voices of ordinary people in places far removed from Silicon Valley, Code Dependent explores the impact of a set of powerful, flawed, and often exploitative technologies on individuals, communities, and our wider society. Madhumita Murgia, AI Editor at the FT, exposes how AI can strip away our collective and individual sense of agency, and shatter our illusion of free will. AI is already changing what it means to be human, in ways large and small. In this compelling work, Murgia reveals what could happen if we fail to reclaim our humanity. 'Brilliant story telling. Books about AI often put the tech centre stage but Murgia makes you, the human, the hero and sadly often the victim in this fascinating collection of stories about the impact of code on our future.' Marcus du Sautoy. 'Code Dependent is the intimate investigation of AI that we've been waiting for, and it arrives not a moment too soon.' Shoshana Zuboff, author of The Age of Surveillance Capitalism.
  • Plunge into the depths of the unknown in this thrilling work of nonfiction that combines science, history, and nature writing to explore the deepest recesses of the natural world. Oceans created, shaped, and sustain not just human life, but all life on Earth, and perhaps beyond it. They are our history — from evolution to exploration and colonialism; our present — from beach holidays to transporting food and goods; and, as rising sea levels and warming water reshape coastlines and the climate, our future. Deep Water is a reckoning with humankind’s complex relationship with the ocean, a book shaped by tidal movements and vast currents, and lit by the presence of other minds and other ways of being. It speaks directly and uncompromisingly of the urgency of the environmental catastrophe that is overtaking us, but is also suffused with the glories of the ocean, and alert to the extraordinary efforts of the scientists and researchers whose work helps us understand its secrets. Immense in scope but also profoundly personal, it offers vital new ways of understanding humanity’s place on our planet, and shows that the oceans might yet save us all. ‘Wise, compassionate, and urgent.’ Robert Macfarlane
  • Rocks and mountains have withstood aeons of life on our planet - gradually eroding, shifting, solidifying, and weathering. We might spend a little less time on earth, but humans are also weathering: evolving and changing as we're transformed by the shifting climates of our lives and experiences. So, what might these ancient natural forms have to teach us about resilience and change? In a stunning exploration of our own connection to these enduring forms, outdoor psychotherapist and geologist Ruth Allen takes us on a journey through deep time and ancient landscapes, showing how geology - which has formed the bedrock of her own adult life and approach to therapy - can offer us a new way of thinking about our own grief, change and boundaries. In a world shaken by physical, political, and medical disasters, Weathering argues for a deeper understanding of the ground beneath our feet to better serve ourselves and the world we live in.
  • In our deluge of information, it's getting harder and harder to distinguish the revelatory from the contradictory. How do we make health decisions in the face of conflicting medical advice? How can we navigate the next uncomfortable discussion with family members, who follow completely different experts on climate? In Third Millennium Thinking, a physicist, a psychologist, and a philosopher introduce readers to the tools and frameworks that scientists use to keep from fooling themselves, to understand the world, and to make decisions. We can all borrow from these trust-building techniques that scientists have tested and developed for more than two millennia to tackle problems both big and small. Readers will learn: - How to gain a solid understanding of the facts that shape our modern world - How to navigate through a multitude of possibilities and make informed choices - How to collaborate effectively in tackling the challenges we encounter today - And much more Through engaging thought exercises, clear language free from technical jargon, and compelling illustrations drawn from history, everyday life, and insider stories of scientists, Third Millennium Thinking presents a fresh approach for readers to untangle the confusing and make sense of it all
  • A carbon neutral future is possible - we have the technology to transform the global economy and guard against the worst effects of climate change. So how do we get to net zero? In Possible, entrepreneur and climate tech consultant Chris Goodall tackles sixteen challenges that we must overcome in making a just transition to carbon neutrality. He explores the technologies that will solve these challenges - from changing how steel, cement and fuel are made, to locking carbon in healthy soils, and from green hydrogen storage to building climate-resilient homes. With case studies and success stories from entrepreneurs across the globe, Goodall illustrates the incredible potential of a Net Zero future, as well as the determination we will need to overcome these problems. New tech featured includes Sweden's H2 Green Steel, California's Fortera cement substitute, Hong Kong garment-to-garment recycling, Finnish turbine company Coolbrook, Norwegian e-fuels, and Captura's innovative ocean CO2 capture.
  • For many people, the name 'Huntingdon Life Sciences' will live forever in infamy. In the early 2000s, Europe's largest animal testing laboratory provoked public outrage, and sparked a resistance movement like no other. Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC) knew the struggles for animal and human liberation to be inextricably linked. The State knew that they had to be stopped… Your Neighbour Kills Puppies tells the complete inside story of this remarkable campaign and the forces arrayed against it. It exposes a murky world of institutional animal exploitation, government collusion, corporate lobbyists, agent provocateurs and police spies desperate to silence dissent. Author and campaign veteran Tom Harris transports the reader into the heart of the action, through underground tunnels and illicit animal rescues, before detailing the brutal state-led crackdown which saw scores of activists violently arrested and imprisoned.
  • In 1811, a twelve-year-old girl uncovered some strange-looking bones in Britain's southern shoreline. They belonged to no known creature and were buried beneath a hundred feet of rock. Over the next two decades, as several more of these 'impossible monsters' emerged from the soil, the leading scientists of the day were forced to confront a profoundly disturbing possibility: the Bible, as a historical account of the Earth's origins, was wildly wrong. This is the dramatic story of the crisis that engulfed science and religion when we discovered the dinosaurs. It takes us into the lives and minds of the extraordinary men and women who made these heretical discoveries, those who resisted them, as well as the pioneering thinkers, Darwin most famous among them, who took great risks to construct a new account of the earth's and mankind's origins. Impossible Monsters is the riveting story of a group of people who not only thought impossible things but showed them to be true. In the process they overturned the literal reading of the Bible, liberated science from the authority of religion and ushered in the secular age. 'An astonishing book about an extraordinary subject' PETER FRANKOPAN 'As thrilling as it is sweeping' TOM HOLLAND 'The most talented young historian around ... A triumph' SATHNAM SANGHERA
  • This is not a book about archaeological sites. We shall come across flint tools, bones, skulls, surprising structures, and layers of earth that we can date to different periods—but they are not the heart of the matter. This book is about us, human beings, and about our place in the world. About what we have done, where we came from, which other humans used to be here, why they are no longer with us, and how and why our lives have changed. It’s also about where we went wrong. What did early humans do because they had no choice and what is the price we paying for this now?Taking as the focus ten sites in Israel, the land corridor through which the human species passed on its journey from Africa to Europe, the story ranges far and wide from France, Spain, Turkey and Georgia to Morocco and South Africa, North America, Columbia and Peru. The authors follow the footsteps of our ancestors, describing the tools they used, the animals they hunted and the monuments they built. Fascinating revelations include:The earliest evidence of human use of fire;The meaning of cave art and the transformative effect of touching rock;The woman for whom 90 tortoises were sacrificed;What happened in the Levant following the disappearance of elephants;The monumental tower built at the lowest place on earth;Why we should envy modern hunter-gatherers – and much more ... This provocative and panoramic book shows readers what they can learn from their ancestors, and how the unwavering ability of prehistoric people to survive and thrive can continue into the present.
  • For the whole of human history, we have lived alongside birds. We have hunted and domesticated them for food; venerated them in our mythologies, religion and rituals; exploited them for their natural resources; and been inspired by them for our music, art and poetry. In Ten Birds that Changed the World, naturalist and author Stephen Moss tells the gripping story of this long and eventful relationship through ten key species from all seven of the world's continents. From Odin's faithful raven companions to Darwin's finches, and from the wild turkey of the Americas to the emperor penguin as potent symbol of the climate crisis, this is a fascinating, eye-opening and endlessly engaging work of natural history.
  • Philosopher Travis Rieder outlines a new ethics for the age of humanmade catastrophe. We are all asking, in a hyperglobalised world hurtling towards environmental destruction: how do we determine the right actions? Do our individual efforts to avoid plastic or air travel, or to drive electric, make any real difference? We urgently need to expand our ethical toolkit. The mental tools most of us rely on to ‘do the right thing’ just don’t work when it comes to reasoning about large collective problems. From the small stuff like single-use plastics to major decisions like whether to have children, Rieder defines exactly how we can change our thinking and lead a decent, meaningful life in a scary, complicated world.
  • Discover which of Earth's wonders should definitely make it onto your bucket list with this unparalleled survey of the world's natural treasures. Landscape photography is combined with 3D terrain models and other explanatory artworks to reveal what lies beneath the surface and how features form. To complete the all-round picture, the plants and animals that inhabit the environments are also included, making Natural Wonders of the World a celebration of our world and the most accessible-ever guide to Earth's geological processes and features. In this book about the world, you will find:-Photography of animals, nature and sites from across the globe to create a visual celebration of our planet's natural beauty. -Artworks and digital terrain models constructed from satellite and other data explain how features were formed and reveal their hidden sides. -Detailed chapters on different continents worldwide- including Asia, Europe, North America and Africa. -Facts, statistics, maps and explanations about our planet’s plants and animals. As well as information about rainforests, glaciers and oceans. Also, explore extreme weather conditions such as Cyclones, Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, sandstorms and dust storms in Natural wonders of the World. This book is organised continent by continent and includes the greatest natural wonders from around the world, from the Grand Canyon to the Amazon Rainforest and the Himalayas to the Antarctic Ice-sheet! Purchase the perfect gift for those who want to tick off their bucket list locations or for those who want to learn more about the planet and the incredible wonders it has to offer. Great for Ages 12+.
  • Would you want to live forever? Nobel Prize-winning molecular biologist Venki Ramakrishnan transforms our understanding of why we age and die - and whether there's anything we can do about it. We are living through a revolution in biology. Giant strides are being made in our understanding of why we age and die, and why some species live longer than others. Immortality, once a faint hope, has never been more within our grasp. Examining recent scientific breakthroughs, Ramakrishnan shows how cutting-edge efforts to extend lifespan by altering our natural biology raise profound questions. Although we might not like it, does death serve a necessary biological purpose? And how can we increase our chances of living long, healthy and fulfilled lives? As science advances, we have much to gain. But might we also have much to lose? 'Spectacular. Beautifully answers the question at the core of every life. It changed my perspective on the whole living world but most of all myself and the time I have left.' - CHRIS VAN TULLEKEN 'Utterly fascinating. Clear, enthralling and packed with insights.' - BILL BRYSON 'A thrilling ride through the science of ageing and death. A must-read.' - STEPHEN FRY
  • Chris Packham's infectious passion for nature will inspire you on your bird watching journey. Chris is a lifelong birdwatcher and the perfect guide on a day out bird spotting. Through a series of chapters, he can build you from an absolute beginner exploring your own backyard, giving you tips and insights that he has gained from years of bird watching. Whether you are in a city or deep in the country, birds are guaranteed and provide an easy doorway into nature. Learn where, when, and how to look and what to look out for. Find out what equipment to buy and how to use it. Discover the different characters and characteristics of birds - from the shy bittern to the bold robin and gymnastic red kite. In this book you can find: -Instructions on how to prepare for bird watching, including Hides and hide etiquette, Types of binoculars,Taking notes and Making sketches-How to identify species of birds- explore Shape and size, Colours and markings, Preening and maintenance and Seasonal changes in plumage-Different types of habitats where you can find birds such as Gardens and balconies, Parks and urban lakes, Urban areas and waste groundAs you build skills and experience, the book will help you expand horizons from walks with binoculars around your "local patch" to visiting remote wildlife reserves and other nature hot spots, with their contrasting bird life and different demands, from dense woodland to expansive estuaries teeming with flocks of waders. Whether you are an expert in bird watching or would like to learn more about bird watching, this guide will be perfect. Learn more about habitats, techniques and birds to help you on your bird-watching journey.
  • Silicon for microchips; manganese for batteries; titanium for missiles. The moon contains a wealth of natural resources. So, as the Earth’s supplies have begun to dwindle, it is no surprise that the world’s superpowers and wealthiest corporations have turned their eyes to the stars. As this new Space Race begins, A.C. Grayling asks: who, if anyone, owns the moon? Or Mars? Or other bodies in near space? And what do those superpowers and corporations owe to Planet Earth and its inhabitants as a whole?From feudal common land, through the rules of the sea, to the vast, nationless expanse of Antarctica, Grayling explores the history of the places which no one, and therefore everyone, owns. Examining the many ways this so-called terra nullius has fallen victim to ‘the tragedy of the commons’ – the tendency for communal resources to be exploited by a few individuals for personal gain at the expense of everyone else – Who Owns the Moon? puts forward a compelling argument for a bold new global consensus, one which recognises and defends the rights of everyone who lives on this planet.
  • Wilding: How to Bring Wildlife Back - An Illustrated Guide is a stunningly beautiful gift book written by Isabella Tree which tells the story of the Knepp Estate in West Sussex. It is illustrated in full colour with lino prints and watercolours by Angela Harding (A Year Unfolding) and photographs from Knepp. Knepp is now home to some of the rarest and most beautiful creatures in the UK, including nightingales, kingfishers, turtle doves and peregrine falcons, hazel dormice and harvest mice, scarce chaser dragonflies and purple emperor butterflies. The sheer abundance of life is staggering too. When you walk out into the scrubland on an early spring morning the sound of birdsong is so loud it feels like it’s vibrating in your lungs. This is the story of Knepp, and a guide telling you how to bring wildlife back where you live. Includes timelines, an indepth look at rewilding, spotlight features about native animals including species that have returned and thrive - butterflies, bats, owls and beetles. There are accessible in-garden activities to 're-wild' your own spaces and the book encourages you to slow down and observe the natural world around you, understand the connections between species and habitats, and the huge potential for life right on your doorstep.
  • Animals are in trouble all over the world. Whether through the cruelties of the factory meat industry, poaching and game hunting, habitat destruction, or neglect of the companion animals that people purport to love, animals suffer injustice and horrors at our hands every day. The world needs an ethical awakening, a consciousness-raising movement of international proportions. In Justice for Animals, one of the world’s most renowned philosophers and humanists, Martha C. Nussbaum, provides “the most important book on animal ethics written to date” (Thomas I. White, author of In Defense of Dolphins). From dolphins to crows, elephants to octopuses, Nussbaum examines the entire animal kingdom, showcasing the lives of animals with wonder, awe, and compassion to understand how we can create a world in which human beings are truly friends of animals, not exploiters or users. All animals should have a shot at flourishing in their own way. Humans have a collective duty to face and solve animal harm. An urgent call to action and a manual for change, Nussbaum’s groundbreaking theory directs politics and law to help us meet our ethical responsibilities as no book has done before.

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